Family spending in the UK: April 2018 to March 2019

Main points

• Average weekly household spending in the UK was £585.60 in the financial year ending (FYE) 2019, a similar level to two years ago (£582.40), after adjusting for inflation.

• Transport, housing and recreation and culture were the largest components of household spending, together accounting for 44% of total household expenditure.

• Average weekly spending rose by 9.1% between 2012 and FYE 2019, with recreation and culture accounting for the largest share of this increase, up from £66.20 to £76.90 a week, followed by household goods and services and transport.

• Spending on food and housing make up 42% of total expenditure for households at the bottom decile of the income distribution, compared with 26% for those in the richest 10%.

• Households in the top income decile spend five times as much on recreation and culture than those in the bottom decile and proportionately more of their total spending is in this category –14% compared with 10%.

Go to the ONS release or read on here for the release:

Average weekly household expenditure on goods and services in the UK, by region, age, income, economic status, socio-economic class and household composition.

Publications

Data

  • Family spending workbook 3: expenditure by region

  • Data are shown by region, age, income (including equivalised) group (deciles and quintiles), economic status, socio-economic class, housing tenure, output area classification, urban and rural areas (Great Britain only), place of purchase and household composition.

  • Definition of household expenditure

  • Provides a detailed breakdown on the definition of household expenditure

  • Family spending workbook 1: detailed expenditure and trends

  • Detailed breakdown of average weekly household expenditure on goods and services in the UK. Data are shown by place of purchase, income group (deciles) and age of household reference person.

  • Family spending workbook 4: expenditure by household characteristic

  • Data are shown by region, age, income (including equivalised) group (deciles and quintiles), economic status, socio-economic class, housing tenure, output area classification, urban and rural areas (Great Britain only), place of purchase and household composition.

  • Family spending workbook 5: expenditure on housing

  • Data are shown by region, age, income (including equivalised) group (deciles and quintiles), economic status, socio-economic class, housing tenure, output area classification, urban and rural areas (Great Britain only), place of purchase and household composition.

  • Family spending workbook 2: expenditure by income

  • Data are shown by region, age, income (including equivalised) group (deciles and quintiles), economic status, socio-economic class, housing tenure, output area classification, urban and rural areas (Great Britain only), place of purchase and household composition.

The United Kingdom Statistics Authority has designated these statistics as National Statistics, in accordance with the Statistics and Registration Service Act 2007 and signifying compliance with the Code of Practice for Official Statistics.

Designation can be broadly interpreted to mean that the statistics:

  • meet identified user needs
  • are well explained and readily accessible
  • are produced according to sound methods
  • are managed impartially and objectively in the public interest

Once statistics have been designated as National Statistics it is a statutory requirement that the Code of Practice shall continue to be observed.

For other ONS News please follow the link.